Category Archives: Hand Mudra

27
February

Origami

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra, Newsletter
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit. It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect. Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions. For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time. Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

Origami

“The hands go ahead of you to meet the world. They symbolize how you are handling life or are being handled. They are the most outward expression of the heart energy, where you touch, caress, show love…” Your Body Speaks Your Mind by Deb Shapiro. You use your hands to create, to write, to hug. While this section is usually dedicated to hand mudras, a commercial I saw yesterday for Extra gum touched my heart so deeply, it is all I want to write about today. So please indulge me. I’ve learned to write what’s in my heart first.

Tears streamed down my face when I first saw this commercial and again now when I found it on YouTube. You see, it mirrors a personal “origami” collection of my own given to me over the 31+ years my husband and I have been together. In that timeframe, we’ve been out to eat numerous times—usually at restaurants with paper napkins and paper napkin rings. Each time he has taken the paper napkin ring and constructed a heartfelt “masterpiece” delivering it with his typical lighthearted smile and a commentary about the “vision” behind his design. He always adds a humble joke about the end product being less than perfect.

I started putting these treasures in my purse and saving them each time. By now my collection has grown to ….well let’s just say there are many! I’ve often commented that if we passed on and someone came to clean out our belongings, they’d really wonder about this eclectic collection.

They are currently stored along with the numerous love notes my husband has written to me over the years—Little slips of paper stuffed into my bags and clothes when I travelled for business telling me how much he loved me, or how great I was going to do. Others were left around the house when he travelled. They were left in places he was sure I’d find them but sometimes hidden so I wouldn’t see them immediately—Little surprises meant to keep my heart filled in his absence.

These little scraps of paper—some with words of love, others manipulated into origami masterpieces—pulsate with the energy of loving gazes, jokes shared, dreams imagined. I can’t bear to throw even one away—they encapsulate my husband’s intention to always be there when I need him in thought, word, and deed.

In their own way, they are kind of a form of hand mudra—they’re a ritual gesture sealing our love for an eternity. According to Japanese legend, anyone who folds 1,000 origami cranes will be granted one wish. I don’t know if I have 1000 creations (I’m not done collecting yet!), but I do know all my wishes have been granted. Create your own energetic origami masterpieces for someone special in your life. You may just find out that indeed “Sometimes the little things last the longest. Give Extra, Get Extra.” Namasté.

origami 2

22
September

Mudra for Higher Consciousness

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit. It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect. Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions. For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time. Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

Mudra for Higher Consciousness:

This month’s newsletter is on ancestral healing. We carry the stories of our ancestors within our energy field. Unresolved conflicts, emotional wounds, damaging judgments, and other limitations held by your ancestors past or present will continue to influence generations to follow. This creates our “patterns”. Our ancestor’s memories lie within our DNA. Deep, unexpressed emotions such as grief, anger, guilt, shame and fear can also be passed to us from our ancestors, just like our eye and hair color. Energy from our ancestors passes through the family tree. This mudra is about being aware of “life’s lessons”—our ancestor’s lessons, and then recognizing and overcoming our patterns.

Description: Sit in easy seated pose (highlighted pose) with back straight. Bend elbows and bring hands at the solar plexus level, palms together and fingers pointed away from the body. All the fingers touch firmly except for the thumbs.

october 2013 hand mudra 1

Tuck your thumbs in between the palms so their tips rest just below the little fingers. The pinky side of your hands touch firmly.
october 2013 hand mudra overview 2

The author suggests concentrating on your third eye. In light of this newsletter’s focus on chakras above and below the body, and the featured pose, I suggest visualizing roots down into the earth connecting you to your tribe—your ancestral lineage—as well as visualizing your auric field energetically connecting to the heavens as though a funnel channeling energy from above.

Affirmation: I am aware of my life’s lessons; I can overcome my patterns.

Source: Power Mudras. Yoga Hand Postures for Women, by Sabrina Mesko

26
March

Anjali Mudra– also called Atmanjali Mudra and Hrdayanjali Mudra.

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Anjali Mudra– also called Atmanjali Mudra and Hrdayanjali Mudra. Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

Anjali Mudra– also called Atmanjali Mudra and Hrdayanjali Mudra.

This newsletter focuses on connecting with your Source regularly, communicating by asking questions, and expecting to receive answers as you would from a dear friend. What better mudra to focus on then Anjali mudra? Bringing your hands into Anjali mudra energetically prepares you to have a discussion with the Divine, be it a request or to express gratitude and reverence. Anjali mudra and its position in front of your heart supports an inner collection of thoughts, promoting clarity, harmony, and balance.

Anjali mudra is often referred to as “prayer position”, or “Namaste” position. Even non-yogis can attest to the sense of repose, silence and peace this mudra promotes. It connects the left and right sides of the brains enabling communication between the two sides. It fosters a sense of beginning or completion, allowing you to give thanks for the moment. Anjali in Sanskrit means “to offer” or “to salute”. This mudra is used when we honor or celebrate the moment. Placing the hands together in front of your heart chakra, with the thumbs touching the sternum brings the prayerful energy into your heart and out from your heart. This mudra calms your mind as it calms your thoughts, creating clarity and reducing anxiety and stress.

“This gesture signifies the potential for an intention to progress to greatest spiritual awakening. When done properly the palms are not flat against each other; the knuckles at the base of the fingers are bent a little, creating space between the palms and fingers of the two hands resembling a flower yet to open, symbolizing the opening of our hearts.” ~ Krishnamacharya

Description: Placing both hands in front of your heart chakra, leave some space between your palms. As Krishnamacharya suggests, this space symbolizes an opening of your heart.
anjali mudra

I opened with the suggestion of approaching your yoga mat as a sacred space. The following meditation for Anjali Mudra, from Gertrud Hirschi’s book, Mudras, Yoga in your Hands, is the perfect complement to that suggestion.

“Imagine that you are at a holy place of power. Perhaps you know of a holy place of power that has special meaning for you. Then, in your thoughts, you can bring it to the privacy of your room at any time. You can also visualize a place that harmonizes with your needs. Imagine this place as precisely as possible. At holy places, we feel a special energy. Try to also feel this energy within yourself. This mudra will bring you to the silence; whether you make a request, ask a question, give praise, or give thanks—if you are willing to be helped, you are certain to be helped at the right time and in the best way possible. At the end of the meditation, remain in silence for awhile. Immerse yourself in the peace and joy of the Divine.”

Affirmation: Full of thankfulness, I receive the good that awaits me.

24
January

Meditation on the Ring Finger

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra
means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

I referenced a great article  back in my September 2010 newsletter and it’s worth repeating:

I found this interesting reference to Yoga Mudras that details more of the science behind Mudras, as well as gives some meaning to the fingers emphasized:

A scientific look

Any living body is made of 5 distinct elements:

FIRE   WIND   ETHER   EARTH   WATER

These are not as per science’s definition of elements but refer to the five building blocks that go into the formation of any living body. Several ancient health systems are based on the concept of the balance of the five elements. Indian Medical science according to Ayurveda and metaphysics affirm that distortion or impairment of the 5 elements create outer disturbance and inner sickness in the body.

The 5 fingers of the hands represent these 5 elements:

The Thumb symbolizes the Fire
The Forefinger symbolizes the Wind
The Middle finger symbolizes the Ether
The Ring finger symbolizes the Earth
The Little or small finger symbolizes the Water

The finger tips of every living being have many concentrated nerve root endings which are free energy discharge points. Science also confirms that around every tip there is a concentration of free electrons. By touching together of the tips of the fingers or the finger tips to other parts of the palms this free energy (Prana) is redirected back into the body along specified channels, back up to the brain. The redirected energy traveling through the nerves stimulates the various chakras. Keeping the hands on the knees stimulates the Gupta Nari and makes the energy start from the Mooladhara Chakra (Root Chakra).

Thus, the tension applied to the nerve/s and/or the neural or psycho-neural circuits formed by the mudras help in balancing the five basic elements (or building blocks). This balancing of the tension and redirection of the internal energy effects the changes in veins, tendons, glands and sensory organs, to bring the body back to a healthy state.

Keeping specified nerves stretched for specified periods tones up of the nervous system. The fingers of each hand are held folded in certain specific postures and this provides the required tension on the nerves.

The fingers of each and every individual in the world are different in their shapes and sizes. These are determined and provided by nature as a tool to bring the nerves into prime condition when affected adversely.

Thus, they provide a different ‘end tension’ on the nerves when different individuals fold their fingers or the same individual folds the fingers by different methods in different Mudras. This is exactly the tension required by that individual for that particular application. Nature has already bestowed us with the tools to be used to keep us healthy.

Compare this with Acupressure where the nerves are influenced by the application of pressure on certain points or Acupuncture, where slight electrical impulses are conveyed through needles inserted in the body. The advantage in Mudras is that the pressure to be applied on the nerves is automatic and controlled by the shape and size of the fingers and not by external agencies.

Because the Mudras work on the nerves, they are a NEURAL SCIENCE.”

~

The ring finger is associated with the earth element which is associated with the root chakra. This newsletter focuses on the root chakra so I offer the following wonderful meditation on the ring finger found in Mudras, Yoga in your Hands by Gertrud Hirschi. The meditation reminds me of the protective knots/granthis highlighted in this newsletter; and how patience is required to release your potential energy, freeing it to move upward, to continue your growth and to live “on purpose”. “Time has no significance. Only the constant growth counts.”

“The ring finger is associated with Apollo, the sun god, and the root chakra, which rules the pelvic floor. This force gives stamina, staying power, and the power to be assertive. The Chinese have classified this finer with the deep meridian of the liver. The power of the liver gives a person patience, serenity, hope, and vision for the future. The “triple warmer” also begins in the tip of the ring finger. This meridian rules all protective functions in the body and is responsible for body temperature, which in turn regulates cell function. If it works in an optimal manner, it gives the ability to maintain our equilibrium in stressful situations. The force that dominates this finger provides stability, is penetrating, and strives upward.

Exercise:

Sit or lie down. Now encircle your left ring finger with the four fingers of your right hand, with the right thumb extending to the middle of your left hand. Close your eyes.

Imagine bare earth and crushed rock in all its forms—as deserts, mountains, and islands. What happens when masses of earth begin to move? When the earth dries out? When the earth is completely exposed to the sun? Now imagine fertile earth. Slowly let the vegetation be created—little plants, big plants, much green. Now focus on one single seed resting deep within the earth. With every breath, something moves inside until the seed bursts and a shoot stretches in the direction of the light. At the same time, it sprouts roots deep into the earth. It becomes a tree that grows very slowly. You wait patiently and watch how the plant develops into its full size. Time has no significance. Only the constant growth counts. The tree blooms anew every year, and bears fruit. Like the tree, we also do not know why this is. Like the tree, we want to give ourselves completely to life, and know this has its purpose, even if we will probably never be able to completely fathom the great mystery. As the tree changes every year, our inner development also continues. We decisively influence whether it is joyful or sorrowful.

Keep holding your finger for a while and feel the flowing warmth. Then encircle your right ring finger and hold it for the same amount of time.

Earlier in the book the author mentions that “If you tend to be chilled easily (which I am!), or susceptible to illness, then encircle or massage your ring finger.”

08
October

Hasta Mudra #3 –Energizing & Calming

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

I participated in another excellent YogaFit® training this past weekend called Yoga for Mental Health as part of my continuing education toward a 500-hour Registered Yoga Teacher certification. It was an amazing class! Below, I used the mudras outlined in a recommended book by Amy Weintraub, Yoga Skills For Therapists, Effective Practices for Mood Management. Great book! Excellent class!

Hasta Mudra #3 –Energizing

How to do it:

  • Sit straight and tall. Interlace the middle fingers in front of the solar plexus with the other fingers gently curled. Pull the fingers apart with moderate pressure while inhaling and release the pressure slightly on the exhalation. Hands are in front of the solar plexus with the forearms parallel to the earth. 

Hasta Mudra #3 –Calming

How to do it:

  • Gently press together the tips or pads of the middle fingers in front of the solar plexus until you sense the best energetic connection. The other fingers may be gently curled in or extended out. 

Source:  Yoga Skills for Therapists, Effective Practices for Mood Management, ~ Amy Weintraub
(Google: LifeForce Yoga Power Point Handout – Yoga for Depression for a great PDF)
http://yougoyoga.net/mudra.html

20
July

Cheerfulness: Chase away sadness Mudra

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Cheerfulness: Chase away sadness Mudra Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping
with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in
airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

 

Cheerfulness: Chase away sadness Mudra

I smiled when I saw this mudra because I used to sleep this way all of the time when I was younger and still find myself waking up with clenched fists. I wonder if I was trying to create my own cheerfulness. As my yoga home studio base closes (and will be closed by the time you read this), I have been searching for ways to raise my mood as I transition to my new location. This mudra is said to raise your mood “much like breathing in the scent of lavender does.”

How to do it:

  • Sit straight and tall.
  • Put your hands on either side of your navel, palms up, fingers facing each other.
  • With each hand, make a fist with your thumb inside.
  • Relax your shoulders.
  • Breathe deeply and slowly for 3 minutes.

Special Note: 
A couple of the author’s clients have said they get a build-up of too much energy in their thumbs when they do this mudra. Stick thumbs out between your index finger and middle finger to make it slightly less powerful.

A second source* describing this mudra—adds visualization:

Inhaling, wrap all four fingers over your thumbs on both hands making closed fists.
-Pause at the top of the inhale and “hear” the sound of OM.
-Exhaling, unravel fingers and draw your navel toward spine.
-“See” fears, stress releasing with the exhale.
-Repeat 6 more times for a total of 7.
-Gently stretch your body. 

Sources:  Mudras—Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress, by Emily Fuller Williams
*http://www.yogacreations.com/blog.html

20
May

Ahamkara Mudra / Sanskrit: I-maker

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Ahamkara Mudra / Sanskrit: I-maker Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping
with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

Ahamkara Mudra / Sanskrit: I-maker

This newsletter has been about being your own hero to create the life of your desires and dreams. You learned about using the power of the words “I AM” to create that life. Akamkara in Sanskrit means “I-maker”.

The solar plexus chakra was highlighted as being where your sense of self is and who you define yourself to be. It’s about using the power of your will. Fear is one of the signs of an imbalanced solar plexus chakra. A strong self is a sign of a balanced one.

Use this mudra when you are feeling “less than” and need to relocate your inner hero. This mudra is used for self confidence and self assertion and for counteracting fear and timidity.

How to do Akamkara Mudra: Index finger is bent slightly. Place thumb on the middle of bent index finger. Middle, ring and pink fingers are extended. I know, I know—looks like I am trying to make shadow puppets, yes?

Hold the finger positions, with both hands, for at least a couple of minutes.

Source:  http://healing.about.com/od/east/ig/Mudra-Gallery/Ahamkara.htm

http://www.eclecticenergies.com/mudras/mudra.php?num=26

24
February

Bhumisparsha Mudra (Gesture of enlightenment, or gesture of calling witnesses)

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Bhumisparsha Mudra (Gesture of enlightenment, or gesture of calling witnesses) Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

Bhumisparsha Mudra
(Gesture of enlightenment, or gesture of calling witnesses)

This newsletter has been all about magical portals and finding our own inner magical realm. This mudra reminds us that “cosmic consciousness in all its forms manifests itself in everything and everyone around us, that we are connected with everything through our individual consciousness.” ~ Mudras, Yoga in Your Hands, by Gertrud Hirschi.

To me, cosmic consciousness is being conscious of the magic. If it manifests all around us and we are connected to it, then we are never far from connecting to our inner magical realm—our magic portal. We are all one—even if we don’t acknowledge the magical realm yet. Connecting to the “cosmic consciousness”, we are guided through our intuition, our third eye chakra highlighted earlier, and we are supported. When we share our insights—our intuition—we are “calling witnesses” to our inner magic.

How to do Bhumisparsha Mudra:

  • Point the left hand down to the earth and let your fingers touch the ground.
  • Let your right hand point upward to Heaven, like an open flower.

Bhumisparsha means “touching the earth” and helps to calm the mind. I often use the phrase “connecting heaven to earth” when cueing a pose. I think yoga is vital to keeping us connected to both. We are the conduit in the middle. This mudra exemplifies that to me. The left hand, our yin or feminine-side hand, connects to the earth—our mother. The right hand, our yang or masculine-side hand, connects to the sky—our father. Connecting heaven to earth, “we are guided, protected, supported, and upheld on our path in life” as the affirmation so beautifully reminds us below.

Source:  Mudras, Yoga in Your Hands, by Gertrud Hirschi

The following meditation and affirmation is also from the above source:

Simply look at an object or being (stone, plant, animal, etc.) While inhaling, absorb its energy, while exhaling, give it your energy. Each breath is like a band, and the connection becomes denser and denser until you merge with it. You can connect with cosmic consciousness in this way, and it will show you the path to eternal unity.”

Affirmation Connected with cosmic consciousness, I feel myself guided, protected, supported, and upheld on my path in life.

 

26
December

Kubera Mudra for Confidence, Achieving Goals, Finding Objects, and More

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Kubera Mudra for Confidence, Achieving Goals, Finding Objects, and More Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

Kubera Mudra for Confidence, Achieving Goals, Finding Objects, and More

Since this newsletter is focusing on new beginnings and discovering your heart’s desire, a mudra that helps you put some oomph behind your future plans and setting intentions is in order!

Benefits of Kubera Mudra:

  • Focuses and concentrates energy for something strongly desired.
  • Puts powerful strength behind future plans (goals and what you want fulfilled)
  • Confidence, calmness and peacefulness
  • It can also be used to find something (lost object, parking spot, etc.)
  • Physically, it opens and decongests the frontal sinuses

How to do Kubera Mudra:

  • Touch the tip of your thumb, index finger and middle finger together.
  • Bend the other two fingers in toward the middle of your hand.
  • Do this with both hands.
  • Hold for several minutes and repeat 2-3 times throughout the day.

Source:  http://wholesomeresources.com/1752/kubera-mudra-for-confidence-achieving-goals-finding-objects-and-more/

“The practice is simple. In your mind, formulate your wish or goal very clearly into words. Ask your heart whether this is good for you and whether it enriches your surrounding world. Now place the three fingers together, phrase your wish in a positive way as you say it out loud three times. Press your fingers together while you do this. Done! If this concerns a parking spot or a new dress, then the mental preparation isn’t as important, otherwise, there are no shortcuts.

The following meditation and the affirmation should be done one to two times daily for several days or weeks:

Visualize your goal, your future, your special wish, in all of its colors. At the same time, develop the feeling as if it already were reality. The thought is the procreative power, the father, the feeling is the form-giving power, the mother. Just like large plants need longer to achieve their full bloom, the same applies to our goals and wishes. It is also obvious that we must make our own contribution to this process.

Affirmation I give my best, and I let the rest be given to me.

Many people already know this mudra as the ‘Three Finger Technique’ from Alpha Training* and use it when they are looking for something specific—a free parking space, a certain dress, the right book, the necessary information, etc. Others use it when they want to put more force behind their plans for the future. It always involves goals that people want to reach, or wishes that they would like to have fulfilled. With the three closed fingers, additional strength is given to the matter and/or thought.

Putting this mudra to specific use in everyday life is quite fun. It also gives us inner repose, confidence, and security.

*Mental Training, which has been developed by Gunter and Margarete Friebe. In 1973, this couple studied the methods of Mind Control, Mind Development, and Alphagenics in the USA. During the past twenty years, they have refined these methods so that they now have an independent, very efficient mental training program.”

Source:  Mudras. Yoga in your hands, by Gertrud Hirschi

26
October

Mudra for Preventing Burnout

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra, Newsletter
Comments Off on Mudra for Preventing Burnout Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping
with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in
airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

Mudra for Preventing Burnout

This month’s focus is on the circle. The circle, along with the square and the triangle, are believed to be the first symbols taught to man by priests over 25,000 years ago, as mentioned in my opening section:

“At one level they represent sun (‘Circle and the One God’), earth (‘Square: the Earthly Mother’), and fire (‘Triangle: the Will’); at another they symbolize the base (crimson), the sacral (flame orange) and the solar (flame yellow) energy chakras. These are the chakras of the Lower (material and physical) self.” Harmony Angel Cards by Angela McGerr. (The base chakra in the second example is equal to the square, the sacral chakra is equal to the circle, and the solar (plexus) chakra is equal to the triangle.)

Since the base, sacral, and solar plexus chakras are represented by the square, circle, and triangle, respectively, I chose this month’s mudra to honor these original sacred symbols. This mudra will also help prevent the burnout that can happen during the holidays!

As we dive into the holiday season, remember to prioritize your time. Doing more than usual is status quo this time of year, so be sure and build in time to rejuvenate. At the very least, taking time outs for a mindful minute of breathing deeply will go a long way toward preventing burnout. Give the gift of a centered, focused presence to your friends and loved ones—you might just enjoy the holidays even more than usual!

Mudra: “Sit with a straight back, bend your elbows, and raise your forearms up and in front of you, parallel to the ground, hands meeting at the level of the heart, palms facing the ground. Fold the thumbs in across the palms of each hand until the thumb tips rest at the bases of the ring fingers. Keep the four fingers straight and together. Face the backs of the hands toward each other and press only the fingertips together. Firmly press the fingertips and nails of each hand together, the upper hands not touching. Deeply inhale and completely exhale.
Breath:  Long, deep, and slow. Repeat a few times and relax. Rest for a few minutes.

Even if it is difficult to hold this mudra in the beginning, after three minutes you will feel rejuvenated and surprise yourself with the power that is within in. The pressure of your fingers stimulates your electric currents and recharges them with vital energy.

Chakra:  Base of the spine—1; Reproductive organs—2; Solar Plexus—3

Color:  Red, orange, yellow.”

Source:  Healing Mudras. Yoga for your Hands, by Sabrina Mesko.

26
September

Mudra for Empowering Your Voice

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Mudra for Empowering Your Voice Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

Mudra for Empowering Your Voice

This month’s focus is on creating your own magic and empowerment. “Crow” and “Crane” pose activates the throat/communication chakra energetically when meditating on “Crow” and “Crane” as a totem.  I chose the mudra for empowering your voice.

Mudra: Sit with straight back.  Bend your elbows and hold them parallel to the ground as you bring your hands up in front of you at the level of your throat. Turn the right palm outward and the left palm toward you.  Now bend your fingers and hook your hands together, the left hand on the outside.  Pull on the hands as if trying to pull them apart, keeping your shoulders down.  Continue for three minutes, relax, and sit still.  Breathe long deep and slow.Source:  Power Mudras, Yoga Hand Postures for Women, by Sabrina Mesko.

See the “Coupler Pull” in the “Meditation on the go” section above for a meditation similar to the mudra above.

26
August

Mudra to increase calm and concentration: Mudras—Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress, by Emily Fuller Williams

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra, Newsletter
Comments Off on Mudra to increase calm and concentration: Mudras—Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress, by Emily Fuller Williams Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping
with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in
airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

Since this month’s newsletter opened with mindful/meditative moments and also highlighted mountain pose for grounding and focus, this mudra literally jumped off the page volunteering to be this month’s focus mudra!  Enjoy!

Mudra to increase calm and concentration

Reduces the distractions (clutter and chaos) of your mind and help you concentrate on one issue.

Mudra: Sit straight and tall.  Bring your hands together; palms up.  Touch the backs of your fingers together.  Make a circle with the thumbs and index fingers of each hand, with the index fingers resting lightly under the thumbs.  Keep the other fingers straight up and touching.  Rest hands on belly.  Breathe deeply and slowly for 3 minutes.
Source:  Mudras—Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress, by Emily Fuller Williams.

26
July

Meditation for Emotional Balance (Sunia(n) Antar)

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Meditation for Emotional Balance (Sunia(n) Antar) Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping
with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in
airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

This month’s mudra is really not a “hand” mudra.  It’s more of a “full body mudra”.  Since this month’s newsletter is all about Yogamint, I am taking the mudra featured in the “Food & Flow” July video from Yogamint’s monthly e-mint newsletter as this month’s mudra.  It is a free download available with the video.

Meditation for Emotional Balance (Sunia(n) Antar)

(as taught by Yogi Bhajan)

Mudra: Sit cross-legged on a flat surface; apply a neck lock to ensure that the spine is really straight. Place arms across the chest and lock hands under the armpits, with palms open and against the body. Raise the shoulders tightly against the earlobes, without cramping the neck muscles. Apply neck lock*.

Eye Position: Close the eyes.
 Breath: The breath will automatically become very slow.

 Time: Continue for 3 minutes and build up to 11 minutes.

Comments: The balance in the body between air, water, earth and ether needs to be correct for you to be happy. This meditation works on balancing the emotions in the body. The body is about 70% water so start with drinking a glass of water to make sure that your body is hydrated. After 2 to 3 minutes the breath will automatically start to slow down. Thoughts will still be there, but you start to have less attachment to your thoughts. This is an effective meditation to balance the air and water in the body to create emotional harmony.

Normally we breathe 15 times a minute, but when we are able to rhythmically slow down the breath to only 4 breaths per minutes we have indirect control over our minds. This control eliminates obnoxious behaviors, promoting a calm mind regardless of the state of affairs.

For a video link to see this mudra in action, please go to:  http://www.yogamint.com/_webapp_3935994/The_Cool_Factor

(*To apply the neck lock:

Sit comfortably with a straight spine. Lift your chest and sternum upward. Stretch the back of your neck gently straight by pulling the chin in toward the back of the neck. Keep your head level and centered without tilting forward or to either side, ie., don’t just bring the chin towards your chest. Keep the muscles of your face, neck, and throat as relaxed as you can.

The neck lock is automatically applied by the shift of relative position between the chin and chest. Do not force your head forward or down. It is common for new yoga students to stretch the neck when other parts of the body are not flexible. When you apply the neck lock, you allow your neck to be open and maintain its natural structure, which helps you maintain better spinal posture in general. The neck lock also “seals” the energy that is generated in the upper areas of your brain stem, so it becomes easier to focus and meditate. http://www.harisingh.com/newsKundalini.htm)

26
June

Mudra for Inner Integrity

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Mudra for Inner Integrity Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping
with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in
airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

Mudra for Inner Integrity

In the opening article, I suggested we shine the light of attention on our resistance to being uncomfortable and see if the habits we’ve formed are habits we want to keep.  I chose this mudra since it helps with honestly assessing our behavior and taking responsibility for them.  I have to laugh because when you look at the posture it makes me want to say “nana nana boo boo” or “neener neener neener”…which would be letting the little child inside out and applying the “comic relief” to a “serious” situation as suggested in the opening!

Posture:  Sit with a straight back.  Bend your elbows and lift your upper arms parallel to the ground.  Bring your hands to ear level, palms facing out.  Curl the fingers inward and point the thumbs toward your ears.  Hold for three minutes and relax.

Affirmation:  I see myself and my habits clearly.  I take responsibility for all my actions and I am ready to conquer my inner fears.

Breath & Mantra:  Short, fast breath of fire from the navel. (See the breathwork section in the Chakrascope above for instruction on breath of fire.) Mantra is “Sat Nam” (Truth is God’s Name, One in Spirit).

Source:  Power Mudras Yoga Hand Postures for Women, Sabrina Mesko.

Another similar mudra is the “Meditation for Habituation” as explained in this YogaMint video and PDF handout available at the link below:

http://www.yogamint.com/_webapp_3186430/Free_Yourself_to_Be_Yourself?A=SearchResult&SearchID=2488592&ObjectID=3186430&ObjectType=35

My May newsletter used the Sat Nam Mantra so I repeat the information here for ease of reference and to re-highlight the Kundalini Blessings Oracle Cards & Guide I highlighted back in May:

Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Wahe Guru.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0psToc4St1o

Sat Nam rhymes with “but mom”.  Sat Nam means truth is my identity. It is a seed mantra—these are single syllable sounds or roots like OM that have multiple meanings and indications depending upon their intonation and the intention with which they are used. Within the seed is contained all the knowledge of the fully grown tree.  It is truth embodied in condensed form.

Wahe Guru:  Wha-hay guroo.  This is a mantra of the Infinity of ecstasy and dwelling in God.  It expresses the indescribable experience of going from darkness to light—from ignorance to true understanding. Guru is the embodiment of the wisdom that one is seeking. )

26
May

Mudra for Courage: Release fear

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Mudra for Courage: Release fear Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping
with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in
airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

Mudra for Courage:  Release fear

Since I talked about finding my courage was within me all along—just like the Cowardly Lion from The Wizard of Oz, I’m choosing a mudra for courage and releasing fear.  This particular mudra was listed in a group of mudras entitled “Reframe thinking group”—just like the Cowardly Lion only had to reframe his thinking to realize the courage was there all along.

Posture:

  • Sit Straight and tall
  • Raise your right hand with your elbow bent, palm facing outward with fingers and thumbs straight up. (Right hand asks for help.  Left hand accepts the help.)
  • Breathe deeply and slowly for 3 minutes.  Inhale protection, exhale defeat.

Special note: Affirm:  “I feel safe and protected.”

Time: Try a mudra for 3 minutes.  You may want to increase or decrease the time depending on how you feel when you do it.

Comments: Some say, with this mudra, you are asking for protection from whomever you put your faith in, which will vary according to your faith tradition.  Sometimes when we’re afraid we may attract what we fear.  This mudra increases your courage.

Source:  Mudras—Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.  http://www.amazon.com/Mudras-Ancient-Gestures-Modern-Stress/dp/0943990408

Book description:

One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping
with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life. That’s why we’re introducing this book on mudras.

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in
airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that’s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.

26
April

Guidance mudra

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
Comments Off on Guidance mudra Tagged with

Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping
with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…

Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures
that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in
airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”  Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

Guidance mudra

This month’s focus is about asking for and receiving guidance from the Universe. It’s also about understanding your personality and characteristics so that you can work from where you are.   So I chose the “Guidance” mudra from this month’s highlighted deck (see below).

Posture: Sit in Easy Pose with a straight spine, with a light Neck lock.

(To apply the neck lock: Sit comfortably with a straight spine. Lift your chest and sternum upward. Stretch the back of your neck gently straight by pulling the chin in toward the back of the neck. Keep your head level and centered without tilting forward or to either side, ie., don’t just bring the chin towards your chest. Keep the muscles of your face, neck, and throat as relaxed as you can.

The neck lock is automatically applied by the shift of relative position between the chin and chest. Do not force your head forward or down. It is common for new yoga students to stretch the neck when other parts of the body are not flexible. When you apply the neck lock, you allow your neck to be open and maintain its natural structure, which helps you maintain better spinal posture in general. The neck lock also “seals” the energy that is generated in the upper areas of your brain stem, so it becomes easier to focus and meditate. http://www.harisingh.com/newsKundalini.htm)

Mudra: Extend the arms straight forward parallel to the ground.  Palms face each other.  Press the wrists together and spread the palms out with the palms and fingers as wide apart as you can, as though pushing against a wall. 

Eye Position: The eyes are slightly open looking down at the tip of the nose.  (Note:  This is why I am not looking at you in the photo!)

Breath & Mantra: Begin rhythmically chanting:

Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Sat Nam, Wahe Guru.
watch?v=0psToc4St1o

Sat Nam rhymes with “but mom”. Sat Nam means truth is my identity. It is a seed mantra—these are single syllable sounds or roots like OM that have multiple meanings and indications depending upon their intonation and the intention with which they are used. Within the seed is contained all the knowledge of the fully grown tree.  It is truth embodied in condensed form.

Wahe Guru:  Wha-hay guroo. This is a mantra of the Infinity of ecstasy and dwelling in God.  It expresses the indescribable experience of going from darkness to light—from ignorance to true understanding. Guru is the embodiment of the wisdom that one is seeking. )

Time: Continue for 11 minutes.  (The meditation is typically concluded by inhaling and holding the breath briefly if you have no medical conditions that a breath hold would be contraindicated for.  While the breath is held, apply root lock, then exhale and relax.  After a meditation it is beneficial to lay on your back and relax, allowing time for your nervous system to integrate these changes.)

Comments: We cannot improve the caliber of the human being, but we can guide it.  When we guide ourselves and are not at the mercy of subconscious habits then we become master of the self.  But overcoming old habits and starting new ones requires strong nerves and willpower.  This kriya develops willpower and gives the capacity to understand the elements of your personality.  You can know what you are thinking and regulate the flow of those thoughts.  This kriya is a perfect Sadhana (daily spiritual practice) for difficulty in completing projects and doing what you intend.

Source: Kundalini Blessings (Featured deck below)

26
March

Mudra to open the crown chakra

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

“One way that all of us can better care for ourselves is by developing techniques for coping with the irritations and anxiety that are part of life…Think of these gestures as self-talk for your hands. These simple movements, the gestures that we often make unconsciously, can help us focus on our work, calm ourselves, release anger and energize us. Used for centuries by many different cultures, mudras are seen in Eastern dance and meditation, in ancient Egyptian friezes, even in Byzantine icons of Christ. Most of us use them today, too: we wave goodbye, we press a hand to our chest in distress, we wriggle our fingers to release energy, or press fingertips together to calm ourselves.

Easy to learn, mudras can be done anywhere, at any time: at traffic lights, in meetings, in airplanes, when we’re arguing, when we’re grieving, when we need to prepare for sleep. The word mudra can be translated from the Sanskrit as that which brings inner peace, and that s what mudras are: a physical means of quieting our bodies.”

Product description for Mudras: Ancient Gestures to Ease Modern Stress by Emily Fuller Williams.

A great video about mudras:  watch?v=e7-iXzMdfIs&feature=player_embedded#at=147

This month’s focus is on the crown chakra and using it to notice the small wonders in our life.  The mudra below is specifically for opening your crown chakra.  Enjoy!

Sitting with a straight spine, interlock your fingers keeping the thumbs pointing upward .

Bring your hands overhead.  Your palms will now be down and the thumbs pointing away from you.

Hold this position for 90 seconds noticing the energetic pulses in your thumbs.  Then lower your hands to your heart center and hold for another 90 seconds.  Relax and breathe long, deep and slow.

Affirmation: I am connected to and part of the Universal creative energy.

I’d like to add a mantra to this mudra: “So Hum” which means “I am that”.

I’ve also used the interpretation of “I am that” in a powerful yoga practice where we were to silently say our “Sankalpa” or intention for our spiritual purpose; and then out loud we chanted “So Hum” while bringing our hands to our opposite shoulders.  This affirms “I am that”.  This wonderful experience was brought to me by Lucy Pirner of Awakening Counseling and Wellness in Hudson, WI.  http://www.awakencounselingandwellness.com/

Source:  Power Mudras, Yoga Hand Postures for Women by Sabrina Mesko.

 

24
February

Mudra for Powerful Insight

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

This month we are focusing on being open to viewing the world a bit outside the box to allow for some magic.  So I picked the Mudra for Powerful Insight.

Sitting in easy-seated pose, with your spine straight, bend your elbows and raise your hands to your belly button.

A gentle fist is made with the left hand and it is placed with the palm side up into the palm of the right hand.  You then cross your thumbs, left over right and concentrate on your Third Eye.

Breathe long, deep and slow holding for three minutes.

Affirm:  I deepen my insight and expand my vision into the realms of timelessness.

This mudra also stimulates the chakra of the month, the third eye charka which vibrates to the color indigo, and suggests one of my favorite mantras:  Sat Nam which means “Truth is God’s name, One in Spirit”.

Source:  Power Mudras, Yoga Hand Postures for Women by Sabrina Mesko.

26
January

Mudra for Two Hearts and Two Wings

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.  It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands.  Each position is believed to have a specific effect.  Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions.  For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time.  Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

Mudra for Two Hearts and Two Wings

This month of the beloved calls for a mudra to connect with your loved one, accept your differences, and experience the true power of two hearts united in love.

How To:
Sitting with a straight spine, connect the thumbs and index fingers, forming a circle.  Spread and extend the other fingers.  Lift your arms to your heart center and cross your left wrist over your right wrist with the palms facing out.  Hook your pinkies together.  Keep all fingers extended and hold for at least three minutes breathing long, deep, and slow.

Affirm:  I am free to enjoy every precious moment of pure love with my beloved.


Source:  Power Mudras, Yoga Hand Postures for Women by Sabrina Mesko.

09
January

Mudra for Detoxification

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit. It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands. Each position is believed to have a specific effect. Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions. For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time. Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

Mudra for Detoxification

Since this time of year falls on the heels of some over-indulgence, I thought this Mudra would be appropriate.  There are some experts that recommend regular detoxification of our diet.  Here’s a great article from Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen about detoxing your kitchen instead:  http://www.realage.com/blogs/doctor-oz-roizen/the-cleanse-that-really-works?cbr=fd1101_mn&eid=9123&memberid=5734411.

Yoga poses for the solar plexus mentioned above are also great detoxifiers. Here’s a more subtle method of detoxification to try.  This mudra is said to remove toxins from the body—both physically and mentally.

How To: This mudra is done with both hands.  Place your thumbs onto the inside edge of the lower joint of the ring fingers.  All the others fingers are relaxed and extended, as shown. Hold this mudra for as long as you like.

“It is important to consider the things, in addition to waste materials and toxins, that you are willing to let go of—bad memories, old grudges, negative character traits, fears, etc.  This will make room for something new.  What should it be?”
Source:  Mudras Yoga in Your Hands by Gertrud Hirschi

09
November

Mahasirs Mudra to relieve tension

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit. It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands. Each position is believed to have a specific effect. Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions. For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time. Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

While the holiday season is a time of much joy, it can also create tension in the body and zap our energy as we all try to fit so much extra activity into our daily schedule.  This is a great mudra for this time of year—both physically for those of us experiencing sinus issues, and emotionally for those of us experiencing tension during the holidays.  The Mahasirs Mudra is used to help give relief for head-related afflictions in particular, and said to relieve all tensions.

Benefits:

  1. It is very useful for migraine.
  2. It relives your eyes from straining. It reduces the mucous congestion.
  3. It relieves from back pain.
  4. Balances energy
  5. Quiets the senses and calms the emotions

How to:

Touch the tip of thumb with the tips of index and middle fingers. Keep your ring finger into the fold of the thumb and stretch the little finger.  Do the mudra with both hands.  Hold as long as necessary—some recommends 20 minutes, some say three times every day for six minutes.

 

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The following meditation is to be practiced while holding the Mahasirs Mudra. Headaches have a great variety of causes and can hardly be made to disappear once and for all with one single mudra. Frequently, weather influences or tension in the eyes, neck, back, or pelvis are at fault; or there are problems with the sinuses or digestion. All of this can result in too much energy being focused on the head, and this leads to tension that causes pain in the head. In order to release this tension, it is important to direct consciousness into other body parts abdomen, feet, or hands.

Begin with some deep breathing to center and focus.  While exhaling, imagine that waves of energy are flowing down from your head through your neck, back, arms, and legs, and leaving through your hands and feet. After a while, imagine that your head is clear, cool, clean, and light. In conclusion, stroke your face with spread fingers and enjoy the feeling for a while.

Affirmation
I have a free, light, clear, and cool head.

Source:  http://www.crystallotus.com/Mudras/26mudra.htm

27
October

Varuna Mudra

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit. It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands. Each position is believed to have a specific effect. Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions. For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time. Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use—not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

Since this month’s chakra focus is on the sacral chakra associated with the element of water, creativity and flow, I’ve chosen Varuna Mudra. “Varuna” means “water” in Sanskrit. This mudra helps maintain the balance of water in your body.

In addition to enhancing beauty and restoring moisture and suppleness to dry skin, this mudra is done when you’ve got a cold, cough, asthma, or other sinus issues. It also alleviates cramps. Mucous congestion is always related to over stimulated nerves, inner tensions and unrest, triggered by overstraining, being pressed for time, being aggravated, or experiencing fear. Mudras, Yoga in your hands, Gertrud Hirschi.

Gertrud Hirschi suggests that when we have a cold, we are also in a rut in other areas. So reduce your workload and obligations, as well as practice this mudra as needed or three times a day for 45 minutes. Then, make a new life plan—those who suffer from mucous congestion are often too conscious of responsibility, feel everything depends on them, and/or that they must do everything alone.

How to: Bend the little finger of your right hand until the tip touches the ball of your right thumb. Place the thumb of your right hand on it. Press the little finger and thumb slightly with your left thumb, and at the same time, your left hand encircles the right hand lightly from below. The remaining three fingers of the right hand remain comfortably straight. (FYI, some references leave out the left hand completely, instructing to simply place the right thumb down on the little finger.)

Sources: Mudras, Yoga in your hands, Gertrud Hirschi,
and http://www.a2zyoga.com/yoga-poses/varuna-mudra.php,
http://bowentherapy.homestead.com/mudras.html.


26
September

Mudra for powerful energy

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.
It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands. Each position is believed to have a specific effect. Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions. For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time. Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

Mudra for Powerful Energy

Sabrina Mesko, Power Mudras, Yoga Hand Postures for Women, uses this Mudra to evoke your power of love and beauty. I was attracted to this mudra’s emphasis on powerful energy after contemplating the powerful energy of the Yoga pose for the month—Warrior I. When I saw that she associated it with power of love and beauty, it was a perfect reminder that a peaceful warrior is a powerful warrior. Lesson learned.

This Mudra emphasizes ring finger contact in the straight position. I found this interesting reference to Yoga Mudras that details more of the science behind Mudras, as well as gives some meaning to the fingers emphasized:

“ A scientific look

Any living body is made of 5 distinct elements:

FIRE WIND ETHER EARTH WATER

These are not as per science’s definition of elements but refer to the five building blocks that go into the formation of any living body. Several ancient health systems are based on the concept of the balance of the five elements. Indian Medical science according to Ayurveda and metaphysics affirm that distortion or impairment of the 5 elements create outer disturbance and inner sickness in the body.

The 5 fingers of the hands represent these 5 elements:

The Thumb

symbolizes the Fire

The Forefinger

symbolizes the Wind

The Middle finger

symbolizes the Ether

The Ring finger

symbolizes the Earth

The Little or small finger

symbolizes the Water

The finger tips of every living being have many concentrated nerve root endings which are free energy discharge points. Science also confirms that around every tip there is a concentration of free electrons. By touching together of the tips of the fingers or the finger tips to other parts of the palms this free energy (Prana) is redirected back into the body along specified channels, back up to the brain. The redirected energy traveling through the nerves stimulates the various chakras. Keeping the hands on the knees stimulates the Gupta Nari and makes the energy start from the Mooladhara Chakra (Root Chakra).

Thus, the tension applied to the nerve/s and/or the neural or psycho-neural circuits formed by the mudras help in balancing the five basic elements (or building blocks). This balancing of the tension and redirection of the internal energy effects the changes in veins, tendons, glands and sensory organs, to bring the body back to a healthy state.

Keeping specified nerves stretched for specified periods tones up of the nervous system. The fingers of each hand are held folded in certain specific postures and this provides the required tension on the nerves.

The fingers of each and every individual in the world are different in their shapes and sizes. These are determined and provided by nature as a tool to bring the nerves into prime condition when affected adversely.

Thus, they provide a different ‘end tension’ on the nerves when different individuals fold their fingers or the same individual folds the fingers by different methods in different Mudras. This is exactly the tension required by that individual for that particular application. Nature has already bestowed us with the tools to be used to keep us healthy.

Compare this with Acupressure where the nerves are influenced by the application of pressure on certain points or Acupuncture, where slight electrical impulses are conveyed through needles inserted in the body. The advantage in Mudras is that the pressure to be applied on the nerves is automatic and controlled by the shape and size of the fingers and not by external agencies.

Because the Mudras work on the nerves, they are a NEURAL SCIENCE.”

http://mudravigyan.com/Mudra.html

I love the connection between Warrior I and the groundedness it brings, and the earth energy of the ring finger in this month’s Mudra. Enjoy!

Sitting in “easy-seated pose” with a straight spine, raise your hands to your Solar Plexus area. Clasp the hands with the ring fingers straight and pressed flat against each other, and all the other fingers interlaced. The right thumb rests on top of the left thumb, and the left pinky finger is the last finger at the bottom facing our lap, Photo #18.

Practice this Mudra for three minutes and then sit in silence with the breath long, deep, and slow. This Mudra works with the heart, throat, and third eye chakras which vibrate to green, blue, and indigo. If you want to add a mantra to this practice, Sabrina suggests “OOOOONG” which translates to “God as Creator in Manifestations.”

She adds affirmations in line with beauty and love:

  • I am all things beautiful
  • I reflect love, happiness, and the harmony of nature

Source: Power Mudras, Yoga Hand Postures for Women, Sabrina Mesko.

26
August

Ushas Mudra

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.
It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands. Each position is believed to have a specific effect. Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions. For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time. Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

Ushas Mudra

This mudra is called the “Break of Day—origin of all good things”.  Nature, and the magic of sunsets and sunrises, is one of my focuses this month, so this mudra is another tool to connect with the sunrise.

“For Men:  Clasp your fingers so your right thumb lies above the left.  The right thumb presses slightly on the left thumb. For Women:  Place the right thumb between the left thumb and index finger, pressing on it with the left thumb. 

Do this every day for 5 to 15 minutes.  Hold this mudra until the desired effect occurs.

“This mudra concentrates the energy of our second chakra and directs it into the energy centers above it.  It gives us mental alertness, pleasure, and new impulses.  In addition, it harmonizes our hormonal system. 

The Ushas Mudra helps us wake up in the morning.  When you are still sleepy and lying in bed, place your clasped hands at the back of your head.  Now inhale vigorously and deeply several times; open your eyes and mouth widely, press your elbows back into the pillow.  While exhaling, let go of every tension.  Repeat 6 times.  If this still doesn’t make you feel alert and fresh, then rub your ankle bones together, as well as the palms of your hands, as if you were trying to ignite flintstone.  Finally, you can also extend your arms overhead and stretch vigorously from head to foot.”  The visualization in the chakra section above is taken from the visualization associated with this mudra in the book.  Enjoy!

Source:  Mudras.  Yoga in your hands, Gertrud Hirschi. 

26
July

Mudra for protecting your health

Written by Sandy. Posted in: Hand Mudra
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Mudra means “seal” in Sanskrit.
It’s a symbolic or ritual gesture using primarily the hands. Each position is believed to have a specific effect. Specific positions can lead to specific states of consciousness symbolized by the hand positions. For example, if a person frequently and with feeling does a position of fearlessness, they will also be freed from fearfulness in time. Mudras are said to engage areas of the brain and/or soul influencing them, sometimes physically, by their use not unlike an affirmation, or reflexology for that matter.

Mudra for Protecting your Health

In keeping with self-empowering our body’s to do what comes naturally—stay healthy, this month’s mudra focuses on protecting our health. Practicing this mudra is said to balance the distribution of red and white blood cells and defend your overall health.

Sitting in “easy-seated pose” with legs crossed and back straight, raise the right-hand as though you are taking an oath. Hold the index and middle fingers together and pointing straight up while you curl the ring and pinky finger down and bend the thumb over them. You hold the left hand in the same fashion with the palm facing the chest and your straight fingers making contact with your heart area. The straight fingers are to be “as straight as possible to create a strong electromagnetic field around you.”

Coupling the mudra with the following breath adds to the benefits. If you have any health concerns regarding holding your breath, please do not do the following breath practice. Inhale for 20 seconds, hold for 20 seconds, and then exhale for 20 seconds. Do this for a few minutes while pulling your navel in as much as possible and then relax.

Source: Healing Mudras. Yoga for your hands, Sabrina Mesko